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You are here : About  >  Conference Sessions  >  Sunday

Sunday, April 7

Session

Title

Speakers

Pre-Conference Morning Breakout Sessions
8:45 - 10:15 AM


 P1

HIPAA Privacy Officer 101

  • Learn how an inexperienced government employee transforms into a HIPAA Privacy Officer
  • See how a Privacy Officer handles the challenges of a local government with over 4,000 staff responsible for being HIPAA-compliant
  • Learn how to forge relationships with your security team
RANDY LEWIS, HIPAA Privacy Officer, Orange County Government

PETER MILLER, HIPAA Security Officer, Orange County Government

 
P2

Compliance Challenges for Advanced Practice Providers

  • Physician Assistants, Nurse Practitioners and Others—Practices and hospitals are employing more advanced practice providers to meet the growing healthcare needs—but they often do not understand the coding, billing, and supervision requirements
  • This session will cover the Medicare guidelines related to services provided in different settings, billing requirements and other considerations. We will provide examples of private payer policy for payment of APP services
  • Auditing considerations will be a focus, along with ideas for managing the risk areas and educating administrators, physicians, and other providers
KIMBERLY HUEY, President, KGG Coding & Reimbursement Consulting

SANDRA GIANGRECO BROWN, Director of Coding & Revenue Integrity, CliftonLarsonAllen, LLC
 
P3

False Claims Act Developments Part 1

  • Understand the fundamentals of liability, damages and procedure under the FCA
  • Review critical recent court interpretations of the Supreme Court’s Escobar decision
  • Discuss recent decisions on determining “falsity” in medical necessity cases
JOHN T. BOESE, Of Counsel, Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson LLP

GARY W. EILAND
, Partner, King & Spalding LLP

MICHAEL MORSE
, Partner, Pietragallo Gordon Alfano Bosick & Raspanti, LLP


 
P4

Leveraging Your Compliance Committee: Practical Approaches to Maximize Your Compliance Committee’s Role, Overall Effectiveness, and Value to the Organization

  • Learn methods to successfully engage senior leadership to actively support the committee’s role, responsibilities and participation to effect real change. Case study and interactive discussion included
  • Discuss best practices and tools through supplemental materials evidencing committee charter, agenda, minutes and other communications maximizing compliance program effectiveness
  • Walk through scenarios and hypothetical situations utilizing committee members to operationalize solutions to tough compliance issues
JUDITH MARBER FOX, Founder and CEO, JF Real Compliance Solutions

DANETTE SLEVINSKI, Chief Compliance Officer, University Hospital

 
P5

Auditing & Monitoring for Health Insurers

  • How to develop a work plan for health insurers
  • Audit and monitoring tools for health insurers
  • How FDRs should play into developing your work plan
NATALIE RAMELLO, Vice President Chief Compliance & Risk Officer, CommunityCare


 

P6

Beyond the Elements: Operationalizing Compliance

  • Considerations and practical advice on operationalizing compliance into multiple lines of business within the same organization
  • Identify challenges commonly experienced by organizations attempting to operationalize compliance for both large and small providers
  • Provide examples of processes and tools that can assist compliance programs move into operationalization

CONNIE RHOADS, VP Corporate Compliance/ Privacy Officer, Christian Horizons

BETSY WADE, Corporate Compliance Officer, Signature HealthCARE

 
 P7

Compliance 2.0

  • Discuss the renewed focus on compliance program effectiveness
  • Consider recent DOJ and OIG issuances reflecting current perspectives and enhanced expectations
  • Explore potential strategies to utilize recent DOJ and OIG effectiveness measures in your compliance program

ANDI BOSSHART, Senior Vice President, Corporate Compliance and Privacy Officer, Community Health Systems

TIZGEL HIGH,Vice President, Associate General Counsel, Legal, LifePoint Hospitals


FELICIA HEIMER, Senior Counsel, Office of Counsel To the Inspector General, U.S.
 
P8

Capture the Big Picture! Design a Risk Assessment Framework that Accurately Depicts Your Risk Landscape

  • Learn how to develop a risk assessment framework with an accurate scope that represents a complete view of your organization’s risk environment
  • Understand how to organize your risk assessment and ensure a complete risk profile is incorporated into a dynamic, functional, multi-tiered framework
  • Discover risk assessment methodologies and approaches that elicit accurate and comprehensive information, gather critical data, and facilitate successful risk prioritization and mitigation
MARCIE SWENSON, Vice President, Skyda Consulting

WADE THORNOCK
, Compliance Director, Blue Cross of Idaho
 
 

P9

Physician, Quality and Compliance Collaboration for a More Effective Compliance Program

  • Learn how physician participation can improve the effectiveness of your compliance program
  • Gain insight on how and where the Compliance and Quality functions can collaborate for mutual benefit
  • Learn how to leverage a diverse compliance committee structure for improved compliance and communications

DONALD SINKO, Chief Integrity Officer, Cleveland Clinic

MARK SANDS, Chief Medical Officer, Stony Brook University Hospital

 
P10

Compliance Program Start Up: What Are the Basics Needed for Your Infrastructure?

  • Describe the fundamental elements of a compliance program
  • Identify ways to leverage current resources
  • Provide tips on getting organization buy in
DEBBIE TROKLUS, Senior Managing Director, Ankura Consulting Group

SHERYL VACCA, SVP/Chief Risk Officer, Providence St Joseph Health

 
P11

Launching Ladies into Senior Leadership

  • Are you ready to launch into the highest levels of leadership? Joining the C-suite? Being on the Board? Then this seminar is for you.
  • Learn how to win champions and mentors; use verbal language and body language to up your confidence and likeability quotients; and move up the ladder using accountability and top negotiating skills.
  • Master lessons taken from female entrepreneurship. Learn why your network is your net worth (and how to grow it strategically) and how to raise the roof on your profile.
Kristy Grant-Hart, Owner, Spark Compliance Consulting

Jenny O’Brien, Chief Compliance Officer, UnitedHealthcare 

Kirsten Liston
, Principal, Rethink Compliance 

 

Break
10:15 - 10:30 AM


Pre-Conference Morning Breakout Sessions
10:30 AM - 12:00 PM


P12

Incident Response: Best Practices in Breach Management

  • Discuss the current environment including compliance trends, issues, regulatory updates, and statistics related to healthcare breach. Focus on small versus large breach, primary causes, and potential risks
  • Review the need for Covered Entities and Business Associates to develop a sophisticated incident response plan. Discuss the financial and reputational impact of breach, and the importance of effective breach management
  • Define best practices to assemble an incident response team, review critical steps in the first 24 hours after a breach, establish communications strategies for patient notification, and develop different approaches for specific incident types
RITA BOWEN, SSGB, VP Privacy, Compliance and HIM Policy, MRO

MELISSA LANDRY, RHIA, Assistant Vice President of HIM, Ochsner Health System
 
P13

Size Does Not Matter: How Any Physician Practice— Small or Large—Spots a Compliance Issue

  • Compliance leaders in medical practices struggle to tailor compliance plans to their organization’s size.  Too big?  To small?  Just right?  Learn how programs should be scaled and effective in practices large and small, including independent practices and physician enterprises that are components of larger organizations.
  • Learn 7 practical and scalable keystones all practices—regardless of size – need, illustrated by late-breaking compliance enforcement news, including how to involve outside counsel to preserve attorney-client confidentiality.
  • See actual language to use in your plan documents to implement a scaled and effective compliance program.
ANN BITTINGER, The Bittinger Law Firm

TAMI HORTON, Chief Compliance Counsel, Cancer Treatment Centers of America

LISA MELAMED, VP Corporate Compliance and General Counsel, Vision Group Holdings
 
P14

False Claims Act Developments Part 2

  • Understand the fundamentals of liability, damages and procedure under the FCA
  • Review critical recent court interpretations of the Supreme Court’s Escobar decision
  • Discuss recent decisions on determining “falsity” in medical necessity cases
JOHN T. BOESE, Of Counsel, Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson LLP

GARY W. EILAND
, Partner, King & Spalding LLP

MICHAEL MORSE
, Partner, Pietragallo Gordon Alfano Bosick & Raspanti, LLP


 
P15

Overcoming Management Pushback to Achieve Compliance

  • At times there may be pockets of resistance from within the management structure, dampening the message the Compliance Officer needs to deliver to all levels of an organization while adversely affecting your compliance program
  • Leaders can be protective of their own operations, often to the detriment of the compliance program. This silo mentality can increase risk across an entity that could lead to compliance issues, paybacks and reputational harm
  • Learn effective ways to overcome this resistance in a constructive and collaborative manner, possibly turning naysayers into strong proponents of your program and true compliance champions
MICHAEL MCKEEVER, Director, Internal Audit, Saint Peter Healthcare System

BRET BISSEY, Vice President, Chief Compliance Officer, Gateway Health

 

P16

The Intricate Journey of Auditing and Monitoring Clinical Contractual Agreements

  • Identify and outline the plan to determine scope, necessary components to verify obligations are met and methods for reporting results
  • Discuss common goals, areas of compromise and deliverables in order to actively manage clinical contractual agreements
  • Share lessons learned both good and bad both large, small and in-between sized clinical contractual agreements

CATHERINE MASOUD, Compliance and Privacy Manager for External Affairs, University of KY, UK HealthCare

JOHN ALLEN, Chief Administrative Officer, University of Kentucky, UK HealthCare

 
 P17

Developing Your Hospice Compliance Risk Assessment

  • Review sources and latest guidance for hospice risk areas
  • Outline key steps in your risk assessment process—who and what to include
  • Learn important tips to help ensure an effective hospice compliance risk assessment process and avoid common challenges

BILL MUSICK, President, Integriti3D

CAT ARMATO, Principal, Armato & Assoc


MARSHA LAMBERT, Principal, Compliance Resources, LLC
 
P18

What Big Data Reveals about Compliance Adherence and How to Launch and Sustain a Compliance-Driven Culture Built On Foundational Components that Reward Conformity, Enhance Productivity and Deliver Cost Savings Across an Organization

  • Attendees will be armed with information and templates to create best-practice compliance workflows that consider all areas of exposure and be able to construct built-in measures
  • Attendees will have access to tools to help identify common pitfalls in compliance policy, education and enforcement; and also obtain a list of the critical data points with a directory for access
  • Attendees will learn techniques to best leverage compliance data and processes within an organization and among all stakeholders creating efficiencies for business impact, a global compliance culture, and central access to real-time data
AMY ANDERSEN, Vice President of Operations, Verisys

JENNIFER GILLESPIE, Compliance Officer, Verisys Corporation
 
 

P19

Increasing Compliance and Reducing Risk Through Information Governance Practices

  • Compliance is dependent upon the trustworthiness of information. Inadequate data and information inventory reporting, inconsistent retention policy adherence or incomplete content classification can result in policy gaps that increase risk
  • Information governance provides the guardrails around the proper use, access, retention, and protection of patient and business records. However, in order for it to work, you must first get your arms around the data and information that you have
  • IG experts, including the Corporate Compliance and Privacy Officer from one of the largest US healthcare systems, will discuss how elements of IG, including retention policy and content classification, can be leveraged to reduce risk and enable compliance

ANN MEEHAN, Senior Consultant, Information Governance, Iron Mountain

ANDI BOSSHART

,

Senior Vice President, Corporate Compliance and Privacy Officer, Community Health Systems

Lee Ann Chapman, Corporate Compliance Director, Community Health Systems

 
P20

Physician Compliance and Risk Assessment: A Two‑Year, Performance Improvement Continuing Medical Education Model to Improve Quality and Compliance

  • Quality, Compliance, and Risk Assessment is effective when driven by motivated healthcare providers. Develop and deliver a high-quality assessment process that rewards providers for improvement
  • The ACCME established the Performance Improvement Continuing Medical Education (PI-CME) process to foster identification of risk and measure quality improvement over time
  • Learn how to combine the goals of PI-CME, quality, risk, and compliance in a patient and provider centric program with long-term buy in and achievement
D. SCOTT JONES, Chief Compliance Officer, Augusta Health

 
P21

Compliance Program, Program Integrity, and Fraud, Waste, and Abuse—Where Does It All Fit? A Lesson in Marrying the Compliance Program, Program Integrity, and a Fraud, Waste, and Abuse (FWA) Prevention Program and Making it Work!

  • Develop a collaborative arrangement between Compliance, Program Integrity, and FWA Prevention Program to effectively manage incoming issues
  • Discuss examples of TFWA cases and share how they were identified and resolved, with lessons learned and best practices
  • Recognize the importance of a FWA Risk Assessment. Review similarities and differences from an organizational Risk Assessment and discuss what is so special for FWA that it dictates a separate Risk Assessment
KELLY  TOBIN, Director, Special Investigations Unit,    UnitedHealthcare

CARON CULLEN
, Healthcare Consultant, Compliance Strategies, Inc

KATHERINE M. LEFF, Director, Special Investigations, CareSource

  
P22  

Recent and Emerging Issues Related to Clinical Laboratory Testing and How to Prevent Them

  • Review top Compliance risks and practical audit protocols to address each
  • Discuss emerging laboratory compliance issues related to claims payment, medical necessity, private payer legal actions 
  • Hear updates regarding the Eliminating Kickbacks in Recovery Act, including arrangements limited to private payer business, marketing services and pass-through billing arrangements
ROBERT MAZER, Shareholder, Baker Donelson

BARBARA SENTERS, Chief Compliance & Ethics Officer, Sonic Healthcare USA


Lunch

12:00 - 1:30 PM


Pre-Conference Afternoon Breakout Sessions

1:30 - 3:00 PM


P23

An Effective Privacy Program Built Through Strategic Vision and Leadership Support

  • Increased risks from malicious external actors and internal threats, combined with an active enforcement environment place significant pressure on healthcare privacy professionals to act with purpose and direction to detect and prevent HIPAA violations
  • A successful privacy program will be led by a privacy professional who understands these risks, identifies and implements key program initiatives based on these risks, and actively seeks to inform leadership of program accomplishments and resource needs
  • Discussion topics include: the importance of an interdisciplinary approach; critical program elements (e.g., 7 elements of an effective program); resource allocation; metrics; leadership; C-suite buy-in; what’s next in privacy; and OCR enforcement

CHRISTOPHER TERRELL, Deputy Chief Compliance Officer & Privacy Officer, Encompass Health

ADAM GREENE
, Partner, Davis Wright Tremaine, LLP

DAVID BEHINFAR
, Chief Privacy Officer, UNC Health Care System

KATHERINE GEORGER
, Associate Compliance Officer, Duke Health
 
 

P24

Student Documentation: The Good, Bad, and Ugly

  • Learn the latest CMS guidance on the use of student documentation to support services billed by preceptors or teaching physicians
  • Hear how two Academic Medical Centers approached designing and implementing the CMS change for student documentation with the use of an EHR
  • Identify audit and monitoring options to validate appropriate use of student documentation
BRENDA MICKOW, Revenue Compliance Officer, Mayo Clinic

MICHELLE DENSLEY, Director Billing Compliance, University of Utah

 
 

P25

Viewing Investigations from a Different Angle: Understanding the Varying Perspectives of Counsel, Compliance Officer and Prosecutor to Improve Your Internal Investigation Process

  • Explore different views of legal counsel, compliance officer & prosecutor as it relates to investigation decision-making through examples and role-play
  • Gain practical strategies to address investigation challenges & optimize your organizations ability to achieve the best possible outcome in government investigations or litigation
  • Discuss application of DOJ FCPA Corporate Enforcement Policy in heathcare arena may impact investigation focus to address presumption of declination & support requirement of disclosure, cooperation, remediation and disgorgement of ill‑gotten gains
HEATHER FIELDS, Shareholder, Chair - Hospital/Health Systems Practice, Reinhart Boerner Van Deuren s.c.

LISA ESTRADA, Senior Vice President and Chief Compliance Officer, Fresenius Medical Care North America

JAMES SHEEHAN, Chief, Charities Bureau, NY Attorney General

 
 

P26

Integrating Compliance Departments in Mergers

  • Compliance Department Integration: Delineation of Duties—How to decide who does what and how to make it work
  • Pulling It All Together: Working together, compliance policies, compliance education, compliance tools, documentation of compliance efforts, reporting responsibilities
  • Highlighting your combined compliance value and compliance effectiveness regularly
WENDY TROUT, Director Corporate Compliance West, WellSpan Health System

SUSAN SHOLLENBERGER, Director Corporate Compliance East, WellSpan Health System
 
P27

Auditing Clinical Trial Billing: A Real-World Approach

  • Conduct hands on review of clinical trials related claims and relate the review to the clinical trial billing rules
  • Understand how to apply the coverage analysis in a clinical trial billing audit
  • Review claims submitted on clinical trials that were denied and understand why
WENDY PORTIER, Independent Consultant, Kelly Willenberg and Associates

CYNTHIE LAWSON, Consultant, Self-Employed
 
 

P28

Actively Assess and Audit Your Post-Acute Service LInes

  • Identify the current high-risk areas of compliance for skilled nursing facilities, home health companies and hospice agencies; learn how to incorporate these into an annual risk and effectiveness assessment
  • Discuss the development, implementation, and resolutions of monthly, quarterly, and annual audit plans and the differences and importance of internal and external auditing and monitoring plans
  • Deliberate the issue of when enough is enough; or, do you audit again and again? And to what end? Avoid large overpayments by creating a methodology for compliance assessments and audits
KATHLEEN HESSLER, Director, Compliance, Simione Healthcare Consultants, LLC

JANET FELDKAMP, Nurse Attorney, Benesch, Friedlander, Coplan & Aronoff

STELLA HARDY, Director of Compliance and Quality, Compassionate Care Hospice

TONI PARKINSON, President, Administrative Systems Inc

  
 

P29

Smooth Sailing into Joint Venture Compliance: Providers, Payers and Vendors Are Aligning by Forming Joint Ventures, but Rough Seas Await Anyone Not Aware of Important OIG Caveats—Learn Best Practices for Smooth Sailing Into OIG’s Safe Harbors

  • OIG Safe Harbors, Fraud Alerts and Advisory Bulletins: Know the five “Risk Indicators” and “Suspect Arrangements” that can scuttle your Joint Venture plans
  • Clear skies for Compliance: Chart a proper course to avoid improper inducements
  • Develop, Implement, and Maintain Your JV Compliance Program: Navigate joint governance and decision-making with wind in your sails
J. ERIC SANDHUSEN, Corp Compliance Dir & Privacy Ofcr, Northwell Health

MARIA JOSEPH, Regional Corporate Compliance Director & Privacy Officer, Northwell Health
 
P30

Risk Assessments: Building Your Risk Program, Developing Partnerships, and Mitigating Risk

  • Fundamental elements of a risk program and enterprise risk assessment
  • Creating buy-in among colleagues and senior leaders
  • Risk vs. Reward: mitigation through execution and follow-through
RICHARD GOLFIN III, Compliance Officer, CenCal Health

 
P31

Population Health, Quality and Compliance: A Look at the Process

  • A review of the role of patients and providers in a qualitative compliant population health environment. The relationship of patient and provider is a partnership with shared power and responsibility in decision-making and care management
  • Person centered care requires giving patients access to understandable information and decision support tools that help them manage their health and navigate the healthcare delivery system. The result is healthier people and affordable quality care
  • The focus on eliminating risk for injury from care, design of standardized procedures and a workforce providing desired clinical outcomes promotes continuous improvement in the healthcare delivery system. The use of these concepts contribute to success

DOREEN HERDMAN, Corporate Compliance Manager, Shriners International Headquarters

RENEE BAINE, Compliance Manager, Shriner’s Hospital for Children

 
P32

Research Compliance for the Hospital Compliance Officer

  • Understand the primary focus areas of a research compliance program
  • Learn about common compliance scenarios that occur in research
  • Explore how deeply the hospital compliance program should dive into research—and when to consider specialized resources
KATHERINE COHEN, Research Compliance Director, MedStar Health

 
P33   

Three CIA Provisions that Will Enhance Your Compliance Program

  • Speakers will discuss several requirements of current CIAs and present their perspectives on why and how compliance officers and entities can use these approaches to strengthen their own compliance programs
  • Board oversight, Executive Management Certifications, and Compliance Risk Assessment and Internal Review Programs
LAURA ELLIS

MICHAEL LAMPERT
, Ropes & Gray LLP


Break
3:00 - 3:15 PM


Pre-Conference Afternoon Breakout Sessions

3:15 - 4:45 PM


P34

The Art of Conducting Effective HIPAA Privacy Intake and Investigative Interviews

  • What information you should gather and review prior to interviewing complainants, witnesses, and parties involved in the privacy incident
  • How to effectively conduct privacy intake and investigative interviews, and knowing when to involve Human Resources in the process
  • Build your Privacy Interview Toolkit: Resources to locate forensic evidence before and after your interviews, sample interview questionnaire, and pre‑interview checklist

JESSICA SALDIVAR, Regional Director Compliance/Privacy, CHRISTUS Santa Rosa Health System

MELISSA ANDREWS, System Privacy Officer, Trinity Mother Frances Health System
 
 

P35

Telehealth Contracting for Compliance Officers: Core Concepts, Best Practices and Tips

  • Telehealth contracting concepts. Issuespot/ understand telehealth concepts integral to COs’ work, e.g., originating/ distant sites, hub/spoke facilities, credentialing, telehealth modalities, e-prescribing, insurance issues, privacy/security
  • Telehealth contracting tips. An overview of essential and common telehealth contracting issues for COs working with provider organizations. Practical tips and strategies intended to help COs ensure clinicians and vendor comply with state, federal law
  • Telehealth contracting best practices. Insights for COs, both daily issues and strategy when launching a telehealth program. Speakers will draw on experience working with a range of healthcare provider institutions to help attendees avoid common pitfalls
JEREMY SHERER, Associate Attorney, Hooper, Lundy & Bookman, PC

CHRISTINE BURKE WORTHEN, Vice President Contract Negotiations, Northern Light Health
 
 

P36

Whistleblowers: Who Are They, Why Do They Blow the Whistle, and Managing the Risk

  • Hear what a leading qui tam attorney looks for when determining whether or not to take a qui tam case
  • Learn best compliance practices to prevent qui tam cases
  • Hear how your organization can manage risks before, during and after qui tam cases
BARBARA SENTERS, Chief Compliance & Ethics Officer, Sonic Healthcare USA

SUSAN GOUINLOCK, Attorney, Wilbanks & Gouinlock

JAMES HOLLOWAY, Shareholder, Baker Donelson

 
 

P37

Who’s On First? Applying Learnings from Abbott and Costello to Achieve Healthcare Compliance Effectiveness

  • Focus on the Home Team: Integrating the seven elements of compliance into partnerships with other stakeholders to leverage data and information to keep everyone on the same team
  • Avoiding the Strike Out: Developing collaboration and strategic relationships with multiple internal departments (e.g. Compliance, Audit, HR, etc.) with overlapping responsibilities for compliance, mitigating risk, and privacy and information security
  • Hitting the Home Run: Putting everything together to create a scorecard for metrics and goal achievement for reporting to the Board’s Compliance Committee
BRIAN CALLIHAN, Director of Special Projects, Sutter Health

CHRISTIE MOON, SIU Legal Counsel, Sutter Health
 
P38

A System-wide Approach to 340B Compliance in a Multi‑state Integrated Health System

  • Overview of 340B compliance requirements
  • Establishing and maintaining an internal 340B monitoring program. Including a through review of the Bon Secours internal 340B monitoring program
  • Review of HRSA expectations for 340B independent audits and scope of work at Bon Secours
  • Synopsis of the Independent External Audit Process and how external auditors can assist in addressing audit findings. SDiscuss the role external auditors, outside consultants and legal counsel have played to assist Bon Secours to remain compliant
CINDY BARTLETT, VP Corporate Responsibility, Bon Secours

COLEY DEAL, 340B Program Manager, Bon Secours Health System, Inc.


SCOTT PONAMAN
, President, Ponaman Healthcare Consulting

BARBARA STRAUB WILLIAMS, Partner, Powers
 
 

P39

From Volume to Value in Post Acute Care: Your New Compliance Data Points

  • Review new payment models for skilled nursing and home health, including the unified PAC model
  • Review the quality measures for skilled nursing and home health
  • Discuss compliance auditing and monitoring: what are your data points in the new models
SHAWN HALCSIK, Corporate Compliance Officer, Encore Rehabilitation

KATHRYN KRENZ, Clinical Analyst, Brookdale Senior Living

KIMBERLY HREHOR, Director, TMF Health Quality Institute

  
 

P40

Compliance Progran Operations vs Conducting a Complex Investigation

  • How to keep your balance
  • Role of key stakeholders
  • Parsing internal vs. external resources
AL JOSEPHS

LAURA JARRETT, Senior Director Compliance, Children’s Health
 
P41

The Risks and Benefits of Healthcare Consolidation on Innovation and Clinical Research in Health Systems and Hospitals, Conducting Due Diligence and the Compliance Risk Mitigation Strategies to Help You Sleep at Night

  • Participants in this session will gain an understanding of the market and regulatory environment shaping consolidation of clinical research in hospitals and health systems as well as the business opportunity and compliance risk it represents
  • Mergers and Acquisitions of providers into research focused learning health systems or “Academic Health Centers” could represent better health outcomes and reduced costs. This trend presents compliance challenges as systems employ different models
  • Participants will be provided with practical guidance and lessons learned when conducting due diligence on research programs with different operating models, including common pitfalls, risk assessment and mitigation strategies specific to research
CYNTHIA HAHN, President, Integrated Research Strategy

EMMELYN KIM, AVP, Research Compliance & Privacy Officer, Northwell Health

 
P42

The Quality-Compliance Collaborative in FQHCs Illustrating the Evolving Model for American Healthcare

  • Understanding the expanding role of FQHCs in the primary care system in the wake of increased federal investment in primary and preventive care under the Affordable Care Act (ACA)
  • Understanding the opportunity for increased Quality and Compliance resources and initiatives in this evolving landscape
  • Exploring the respective roles and opportunity for collaboration between Quality and Compliance leaders, working with and engaging Operations and Medical Staff, in meeting the requirements under HRSA, the FTCA, the OIG and federal 330 grant requirements

ANA-CRISTINA NAVARRO, Chief Compliance Officer, Shasta Community Health Center

MARYA CHOUDHRY, Director of Quality Improvement, Shasta Community Health Center

 
P43

Examining the Foundational Features of a Patient Protection-Driven Compliance Program

  • Attendees will be entertained, inspired and awakened by frank and unrehearsed conversation between industry thought leaders on the topic of healthcare compliance and how far it has come as a career track and an important industry segment
  • Attendees will gain a better understanding of the way healthcare compliance shapes the way organizations operate and echoes throughout the entire industry
  • Attendees will come to discern the margins and overlap between what is required by law, what is outlined by standard setting bodies, and what should be minimally required by corporate ethical bylaws
JOHN BENSON, CEO, Verisys Corporation


 
P44   

Next Generation Compliance: How Metrics Should Drive Your Compliance and Ethics Program

  • The core compliance and ethics challenge: Shaping human behavior
  • How metrics and scorecards can focus attention and drive behavior
  • Hundreds of compliance and ethics metric ideas addressing healthcare organization's key risks
DANIEL ROACH, Chief Compliance Officer, Optum 360


Networking Reception in Exhibit Hall

4:45 - 6:30 PM